Clove, It’s Not Just for Dessert

Syzygium aromaticum

Image courtesy of zoyachubby at flickr.com

Cloves remind me of winter. They are at home on a holiday table seen in pretty spiced cookies, a studded-orange decoration, or sweet mulled wine. It may be too early to stir up winter memories, but clove essential oil can be used year-round.

The essential oil of clove (Syzygium aromaticum) has a warm, sweet smell. It is welcome in cool weather, but with properties that make it useful any day – antibacterial, antifungal, antimicrobial, antiseptic and antiviral. Clove is also anti-inflammatory and analgesic making it helpful in relieving muscle aches and dental pain (yes, what the dentist uses is extracted from cloves).

Did you know that clove is being investigated to treat gastrointestinal disorders? A study was done to see if clove essential oil can be used in the treatment of stomach ulcers. It was observed to possess antiulcer activity due to its ability to stimulate the synthesis of mucus which protects the stomach. Cloves sound like tasty medicine.

Clove is stimulating and uplifting in a blend. This recipe from American College of Healthcare Sciences helps purify the air or enliven a party:
3 drops Clove (Syzygium aromaticum) essential oil
3 drops Cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum) essential oil
3 drops Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) essential oil
3 drops Peppermint (Mentha piperita) essential oil
3 drops Pine (Pinus sylvestris) essential oil
3 drops Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) essential oil
3 drops Thyme (Thymus vulgaris) essential oil
1/2 oz. Distilled Water
1/2 oz. Alcohol
Mix in a 1 oz. sprayer bottle or place the undiluted essential oil blend in a vaporizer.