Myrrh for Winter Well-Being

Myrrh

Commiphora myrrha

An essential oil that so clearly signifies winter and the holiday season is Myrrh (Commiphora myrrha). The resin is often mentioned in connection with the birth of Jesus, and is also considered a spiritual scent. The essential oil itself has remarkable healing properties for dry skin and respiratory infections making wintertime a great time to use Myrrh.

Its warm, resinous, and slightly spicy scent can enhance your indoor atmosphere, whether you have a crowd of folks over or are doing solo introspection. The oil is considered calming and can bring a sense of inner peace while also reviving the spirit. A diffused blend with Myrrh in it will also be anti-infectious to help you from catching the latest cold that’s going around.

If you do happen to get sick, Myrrh is useful for relieving coughs, catarrh, and bronchial congestion, and also killing infections in the lungs. It acts as a decongestant and expectorant so you can rid your body of germs.

Myrrh essential oil has been studied for its impact on human cancer cells. Researchers found that it had “anticancer activities that are likely to arrest the proliferation of prostate cancer cells.” The essential oil was also found to have a marked effect on breast cancer cells, causing them to die. This offers some hope, but more investigations are necessary to confirm the oil’s antitumor results.

A popular use for Myrrh is to assist in the deep healing of dry, cracked, or chapped skin. It is anti-inflammatory and helps skin heal by forming scar tissue. It can also fight fungal or bacterial infections to keep your damaged skin clean. The following recipe will aid in the quick repair of your wintery dry and sore cuticles:
Cuticle Balm
1 ounce coconut oil
5 drops Frankincense (Boswellia carteri)
1 drop Geranium (Pelargonium graveolens)
3 drops Lemon (Citrus x limon)
3 drops Myrrh
Gently melt the coconut oil over low heat on the stove. Pour into a small jar. Add the essential oils and stir. Use several times a day on cracked cuticles.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s